Jamie Teh - Inaugural Champion

Consultation has concluded

Jamie Teh

Co-creator – screed reader for blind and vision impaired Non Visual Desktop Access (NVDA)

Jamie founded the not-for-profit organisation NV Access, along with his childhood friend (Michael Curren), to support the development of the NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) screen reader.

For blind people to use a computer, they need a screen reader which reads the text on the screen in a synthetic voice or with a braille display. But in many cases screen reading software costs more than the computer itself.

In the past this has left computers inaccessible to millions of blind people around the world. This is a critical problem because without computers, access to education and employment is severely limited, not to mention everyday functions such as online banking, shopping and news.

To date, the NVDA platform has:

  • been translated by volunteers into more than 43 languages

  • been used by people in more than 120 countries

  • won multiple awards.

NVDA is open source software, which means the code is accessible to anyone. This enables translators and developers around the world to continually contribute to its expansion and improvement.

Through his work, Jamie has fostered relationships with companies such as Mozilla, Microsoft, IBM, Adobe and Yahoo! and has contributed to the accessibility of their respective products.

Jamie is passionate about helping to connect blind people all over the world with the digital economy and social networks.

Jamie Teh

Co-creator – screed reader for blind and vision impaired Non Visual Desktop Access (NVDA)

Jamie founded the not-for-profit organisation NV Access, along with his childhood friend (Michael Curren), to support the development of the NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) screen reader.

For blind people to use a computer, they need a screen reader which reads the text on the screen in a synthetic voice or with a braille display. But in many cases screen reading software costs more than the computer itself.

In the past this has left computers inaccessible to millions of blind people around the world. This is a critical problem because without computers, access to education and employment is severely limited, not to mention everyday functions such as online banking, shopping and news.

To date, the NVDA platform has:

  • been translated by volunteers into more than 43 languages

  • been used by people in more than 120 countries

  • won multiple awards.

NVDA is open source software, which means the code is accessible to anyone. This enables translators and developers around the world to continually contribute to its expansion and improvement.

Through his work, Jamie has fostered relationships with companies such as Mozilla, Microsoft, IBM, Adobe and Yahoo! and has contributed to the accessibility of their respective products.

Jamie is passionate about helping to connect blind people all over the world with the digital economy and social networks.