Ben Munford - Inaugural Champion

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Ben Munford

Volunteer – Brisbane Seniors Online

Ben’s first contact with personal computers was the Apple 11E back in the early 1980s when he used the technology for simple data correlation in criminal investigation work.

In 1997, Ben retired from the police force at the relatively young age of 49 and migrated to Brisbane, where he has since put his leadership and computer skills to use as a volunteer with Brisbane Seniors OnLine (BSOL).

Since joining the organisation, Ben has helped approximately 215 seniors on a one-to-one basis, teaching in members own homes on their own computer, tablet or smart phone. Once a month he also runs a 2-hour technology clinic in the Carindale Public Library.

With Brisbane Seniors OnLine, Ben provides help on demand to:

  • anyone over 50 years of age

  • help set up and configure technology

  • improve digital confidence and competency levels

  • achieve personal digital goals (not work or employment related)

  • trouble shoot members problems from home using TeamViewer.

In his role, Ben is also responsible for matching learners with mentors in Brisbane’s East Hub – this area currently has 148 learners and 19 active mentors and is one of the busiest in the Brisbane Seniors OnLine network.

Ben is motivated by the smile on people’s faces when they suddenly realise that it is not that difficult to master the technology that confronts them.

One of his first students was a gentleman in his 80s, who lived alone and had a spinal condition meaning he was housebound. Ben taught him how to surf the web, research things that interested him, use Skype to chat to his brother in Canada and send emails. His life completely changed as he began to interact with the world around him.

Ben believes that it is vital that seniors use the technology available to them – life should not be wasted in queues at the Post Office paying bills or in the bank transferring money.

This is especially true if you are housebound. Supermarkets now have a home delivery service, coupled with an online ordering service. Digital games can also keep you mentally active whether you put your skills against a machine or play with others online.

Ben Munford

Volunteer – Brisbane Seniors Online

Ben’s first contact with personal computers was the Apple 11E back in the early 1980s when he used the technology for simple data correlation in criminal investigation work.

In 1997, Ben retired from the police force at the relatively young age of 49 and migrated to Brisbane, where he has since put his leadership and computer skills to use as a volunteer with Brisbane Seniors OnLine (BSOL).

Since joining the organisation, Ben has helped approximately 215 seniors on a one-to-one basis, teaching in members own homes on their own computer, tablet or smart phone. Once a month he also runs a 2-hour technology clinic in the Carindale Public Library.

With Brisbane Seniors OnLine, Ben provides help on demand to:

  • anyone over 50 years of age

  • help set up and configure technology

  • improve digital confidence and competency levels

  • achieve personal digital goals (not work or employment related)

  • trouble shoot members problems from home using TeamViewer.

In his role, Ben is also responsible for matching learners with mentors in Brisbane’s East Hub – this area currently has 148 learners and 19 active mentors and is one of the busiest in the Brisbane Seniors OnLine network.

Ben is motivated by the smile on people’s faces when they suddenly realise that it is not that difficult to master the technology that confronts them.

One of his first students was a gentleman in his 80s, who lived alone and had a spinal condition meaning he was housebound. Ben taught him how to surf the web, research things that interested him, use Skype to chat to his brother in Canada and send emails. His life completely changed as he began to interact with the world around him.

Ben believes that it is vital that seniors use the technology available to them – life should not be wasted in queues at the Post Office paying bills or in the bank transferring money.

This is especially true if you are housebound. Supermarkets now have a home delivery service, coupled with an online ordering service. Digital games can also keep you mentally active whether you put your skills against a machine or play with others online.